Tag Archives: being vegan

Guest Blogger: Steps in Stilettos – How I became vegan

27 Mar
Hey everyone! Put your hands together for our newest contributor Jamie, author of the blog Steps in Stilettos. Her post is about her journey into veganism.  Join Jamie on her blog, facebook page, and Twitter account. Welcome Jamie!
A little bit about how I discovered a plant-based lifestyle was when I first decided to become a vegetarian at the age of fifteen and I really started thinking about where my food came from and what I was eating.   I was in high school taking biology class and our assignment was to disect different types of insects and animals.  Looking at the insides of animals got me thinking about what exactly I was eating.  The thought made me nauseaus and I came home to declare to my parents that I was going to become a vegetarian.  Of course, they were shocked, as no one we knew ate this way.  They had no idea what to feed me and I mostly ate cereal, as I also didn’t really know what to eat.  I took a multivitamin every day because I was convinced by others that I couldn’t possible be getting adequate nutrition as a vegetarian.  However, this transition for me personally, aside from being controversial, was relatively easy because I didn’t change the way I ate, I really just cut out all forms of meat and replaced them with cheese versions.  I could still go to family and friends’ homes for dinner and was always able to eat some part of what was being served.  At restaurants, I even still had some variety of choices.  I remained vegetarian through college and began discovering the new tofu based meat substitutes that were more actively coming on the market.   However, like many Americans, I still had no clue about nutrition and what vitamins and minerals my body needed to thrive.  I was really just trying to eat as “normally” as possible while still holding onto my values.
It wasn’t until age 28 that I discovered and opened myself up to the vegan and plant-based worlds.  I remember I was stuck in the airport at work and my boss actually recommended that I read “Skinny Bitch,” a new and controversial book that had just come out, since he knew I was vegetarian.  Since I was already bored, I immediately went into the airport bookstore and bought the book.  Do you ever believe that certain moments happen for a reason?  As I get older, I believe in this more and more.   I read almost half of the book before I arrived home that night, addicted to the pages and hungry for more information!  What this book opened my eyes to was the fact that dairy cows are subjected to huge amounts of pain and suffering and that by consuming milk and dairy, I was still contributing to animal creutly.  What’s more is that I learned that animals products were actually bad for us, a completely new idea to me, and that much more nutrition could be obtained from plant-based foods.    This revelation sent me on my path to reading more books about plant-based nutrition from authors like Dr. Barnard, Christina Pirello, Dr. Esselstyn, T. Colin, Campbell, Alicia Silverstone, and more!  I kept wanting to learn more and more because this paradigm shift in thinking was fascinating to me and so different from anything I was taught growing up.  I even took classes through Cornell University in their Plant-Based Nutrition Program to earn a Certificate.  The classes and lecturers in that program are amazing and were able to give me detailed answers to everything I ever wanted to know, such as links to animal protein and diseases like cancer, how different vitamins and nutrients act in our bodies and why plant-based eating is the healthiest diet.   By surrounding myself with information and different support groups through the classes and online community, it gave me the confidence to stick with the diet and the information I needed to continue on my path of healthy living.  I love life and I want to enjoy it as much as I am able.  To me, that doesn’t necessarily mean trying to outlive everyone, it means living the days that I have with as much energy to do the things I want to do and to experience life without being sick, stuck on medicine, or in the hospital for treatments.
Becoming plant-based has changed my life for the better!  As a child and young adult, I suffered from relatively severe allergies and asthma.  I was in the hospital at least once a year for breathing treatments, had to carry an inhaler everywhere with me, and was dependent on taking allergy pills for most days of the year.   Being sick as a young child made me believe that I would be dependant on medicine for the rest of my life.  When I cut out meat products at the age of fifteen, I noticed an improvement in my asthma and allergies.  I was able to play outside and run without having an asthma attack.  I see the correlation now, but as a young adult, everyone just told me I was “growing out of my asthma” and that’s what I believed.  However, as soon as I cut out dairy products, my allergies and asthma disappeared!  I currently have no need for allergy pills and I don’t even own an inhaler!  It is so freeing being able to even say that, as I never thought it would be a possibility for me.  Asthma attacks and weazing are a distant memory of my past and something I don’t see myself having to deal with again.  These days, I feel energetic, vibrant and healthy and can be as active as I want!  It’s truly amazing!  I have taken control of my health simply by the foods that I choose to put into my mouth everyday!

Guest Blogger: RedGlitterX – Easy Chocolate Ice-cream – Vegan (recipe)

9 Jan

Always lovely to have people come back to the VBU! family. One such bloggers is RedGlitterX. From Australia, here she is in her own words, “With degree in theology and feminism, am also a Ordained Clergy Person, I have a strong social justice and civil rights ethic. The fight for animal rights is one of the more important, how we treat animals is a reflection on ourselves.” Her first post with VBU! was about the different names we give foods around the world. Her second post was a Decadent Triple Chocolate Cake recipe and her third, a dinner menu from the last trip of the Titanic, her fourth, post was about what Veganism is. For her latest post she is back with a lovely dessert recipe. Find her blog here: Vegan Animal Liberation Alliance. Follow her on Twitter as well. Welcome back Red Glitter X!

Easy Chocolate Ice-cream – Vegan (recipe)
Easy to make and even easier to eat. This chocolate ice-cream is a good substitute for those who miss it, or just want something that they can make at home to avoid the commercial products (which require a science degree to understand the ingredients list).

This recipe does not require an ice-cream machine. All measurements are rough-guides, adjust for taste.


This chocolate ice-cream stays smooth when frozen, does not form ice-crystals, and if left in a serving bowl too long melts into a tasty chocolate milk drink

Equipment:
Medium sized saucepan
Tablespoon – for measuring
Spoon – for stirring
Freezer-safe container with a lid
Grater (optional)
Measuring jug (optional)

Ingredients:
4 heaped tablespoons of cocoa powder
3 heaped tablespoons of brown sugar (or char free sugar of choice)
2 heaped tablespoons of corn flour
pinch of salt
pinch of spice, eg. cinnamon, nutmeg
100 grams of grated chocolate (chocolate bar style chocolate)
conversion: 100 grams = 3.5274 ounces
about 3/4 of a litre / quart Milk of your choice (eg, almond, soy, rice)
conversion: 1 litre = 1.05669 US quart

Method:
Add some of the milk to the saucepan, heat over a very low heat

In the same bowl that ice-cream will be made in, mix the cocoa powder, brown sugar, corn flour, salt, spice

Add cocoa mixture to the slowly heating milk, mix well to remove any lumps

Chocolate milk mixture will start to thicken, stir well so it does not burn on the bottom

Add rest of the milk

Add the chocolate, grated or choc-chip sized to the milk, keep stirring. Do Not let the chocolate burn

When chocolate is melted, transfer to a freezable container.

Freeze, this will take a few hours

Variations:
add cherries to give it a hint at Black Forest flavour
add alcohol-soaked raisins for a more adult variety
add chopped banana and flaked almonds
grated chocolate for choc-chip chocolate ice-cream

Guest Blogger: New Vegan Age – A perfect time to stop eating animals

20 Dec

Love when we have veteran posters come back! One such contributor is Tom of New Vegan Age. Please feel free to search the blog name on VBU! to read more posts from his lovely blog. Especially Kim Stahler’s post, featured on VBU!, caught a few people’s attention. Follow New Veagn Age on: Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and of course the blog itself. Welcome back Tom!

Would you be able to kill an animal? If not, and you still eat meat, you’re not living in alignment with your values.

 
I know, I know. People sometimes say, “Animals kill and eat each other. We’re no different.”
 

Well, as one of my heroes, Harvey Diamond, first pointed out to me in his brilliant Fit For Life books, could you kill an animal yourself? Could you do what other animals do—chase it down, strangle or smother it, tear it apart with your bare hands, and swallow it raw?

 
This deliciously-seasoned, nutritious,
colorful holiday stuffing is but one of
thousands of delicious recipes that
prove giving up meat isn’t a sacrifice.
If you react to this question with disgust—and couldn’t or wouldn’t yourself actually go through with killing a living being—you’re already a vegetarian in belief, if not yet practice. In addition to the growing number of health and environmental reasons to turn exclusively to plants for nutrition, many vegans and and vegetarians stop eating animals because they would not ask someone else to do for them what they themselves would not do.
 
“I would not kill a creature,” said another of my heroes, Peace Pilgrim. “And I would not ask someone else to kill it for me, so I will not eat the flesh of the creature.”
 
Other signs that you might “already” be a vegetarian or vegan include:
  • You find the sight—or even idea—of a butchered animal or slaughterhouse unsettling.
  • You sometimes sense a “vague uneasiness” when you buy, order, or eat animal products.
  • You sometimes feel like you’re not living in alignment with your “true self.”
After Thanksgiving 1997, I realized I no longer wanted to have others kill animals on my behalf, and I declared that holiday the last time I’d ever eat turkey. A month later, I made Christmas the last time I’d ever eat ham. That New Year’s Day’s became a natural time to celebrate the “good luck” tradition of pork and sauerkraut with the resolution to never eat animals again.
 
You know, the holidays are the perfect time to give yourself, the planet, and animals this gift. It’s already a time of reflection, of renewal, of gratitude, of introspection, of compassion, and, of course, of commitment. If the thought of killing your dog or cat—or any animal—gives you a lump in your throat and a knot in your stomach, you’re already a vegetarian in belief, and you’re ready to take this exciting next step.
 
Best of all, there’s no sacrifice at all in being vegetarian or vegan, only the rewards of a rich variety in food, improved health, and a much lighter spirit.

Guest Blogger: AusVegan – If Not You, Then Who? If Not Now, Then When?

27 Nov

Always happy to welcome another vegan blogger to the VBU! family. Cameron Blewett is a very busy vegan blogger. He has contributed to VBU! with a post from his blog AusVegan. Here’s his bio, “Based in Brisbane, Cameron is a prolific blogger with a number of sites relating to different subject matters. This one is dedicated to his passion for veganism and Animal Rights. His main site CameronBlewett.com.au is where he does most of his posting, along with his new site VeganSexual.com.au which aims to challenge the common held misconceptions of being male and vegan. Make sure you don’t miss a post on AusVegan.com by subscribing to the mailing list here. You can find Cameron on Google+ , Twitter, or Facebook” Welcome Cameron!

If, as a vegan, you aren’t going to take a stand and promote veganism, then who do you think will?
If you aren’t going to promote it now, when will you?

I was sitting down last night, pen in hand, going over the various discussions I have had with people over the past few days to get ideas for coming blog posts, when the sound of a freight train in the distance broke my concentration.

For some reason I decided to pay a little more attention to it, and see if by just listening to it I would be able to tell if it was a standard freight train or a cattle train heading out to the Dinmore slaughterhouse.

At the time and possibly out of denial, I made the assessment that it was just a regular freight train because there wasn’t the distinctive ‘rattle’ of the gate on each wagon, and there was a noted absence of the lingering smell that usually accompanies these trains. Continue reading

Guest Blogger: Marty’s Flying Vegan Review – Make One More

16 Nov

Marty is a veteran of VBU! he’s an unique contributor as he is a vegan pilot who gets the chance to share his experience travelling to so many countries. Marty’s blog is aptly named Marty’s Flying Vegan Review. Click here to read Marty’s first contribution and HERE to read his post “Vegan, what’s your job?”, HERE for his review of Loving Hut in Pittsburgh, HERE for his review of Quoron’s Vegan Burger and HERE for his response on an article to ‘being mostly vegan’.  Please welcome Marty!

The other day the cashier at Chipotle commented that she liked my shirt.  I was wearing my Dr. Fuhrman shirt from the Nutritarian Festival in Aspen that I was lucky enough to stumble into a few years ago.  The festival, not the shirt.  It says, “Kale is the New Beef.”  It’s one of my many conversation starting “tools”, and shirts, along with buttons and pins can sometimes start a conversation.  I’m not going to say I’ve created many vegans a la minute but I know I’ve gotten a bunch of people thinking about their food.  Like hockey, (come ON NHL), I may not have scored the goal but my pass earned an assist.  I always have SOMETHING on SOMEWHERE that says either, “vegan,” or “animals,” or “food.”

The conversation went like this:
“I like your shirt.”
“Thanks.”
“I’m a vegetarian.”
“That’s great.  I’m a vegan.”
“Oh, really, high five, I am too!”
We slap palms.
“Why don’t you say you’re vegan?”
“I think it sounds a little —” (Now in all honesty I forgot what she said.  It could have been presumptuous, or pompous, preposterous or … it doesn’t matter).
“Well, I think if we all use the word more it will be a lot more common and less — sounding.”
“Hey, you’re right.  I’m vegan!”
Seriously, that’s how it went.
In this day and age I think we’re at a tipping point.  For a lot of things.  Republican Independent Michael Bloomberg just came out admitting that there is actually something called climate change, (read Global Warming).  It’s also a day and age where you almost can’t help but to hear the word “vegan” at least once.   People are getting used to the word.  It’s not as odd as it once was.  They may even have a curious thought about it.
I just helped Jordan Wyatt of the Invercargill Vegan Society with his podcast, “Co Existing with Non-Human Animals.”  My last message was this:  Make One More.  What I mean is, we’re about 4% of the population right now.  If we all just committed in this coming year between World Vegan Days to just “Make One More” vegan, we will have doubled in size.  At that point we’ll be bearing down on the magical 10% number.  10% of anything is worth sitting up and taking note of.  It’s enough of a number that people who sell things take note of as a slice of market share worth catering too.  It’s the start of a movement that has finally gotten a foothold and moved from the fringe looney bin to a bit part on the world stage.  With it comes a modicum of power.  With a modicum of power we can save a lot of lives.
So say it if you are it and let’s all commit to Make One More.

Guest Blogger: Marty’s Flying Vegan Review – Response to article “On Being Mostly Vegan”

3 Jul
Please welcome back our resident vegan pilot Marty, who is the author of his blog Marty’s Flying Vegan Review, with his response to an article on the Huffington Post about veganism. Here is in his own words, ” From New York, New York, 55 years old and I’ve recently, (around June or so 2010), come to some decisions and have put up my tent smack dab in the middle of the Vegan camp. I still ponder such things as to how far to drill down into ingredient lists and the role that ancillary things to the animal industry such as belts and shoes play but for now I do the absolute best to order vegan dishes and of course still cook 100% Vegan. I won’t throw out my non vegan clothes but will no longer purchase anything made primarily from an animal, (leather, wool, etc.). I’m pondering a podcast just to throw out my opinion, (why not? Seems as if everyone else with one has a soapbox), on just such topics as veganism, diet, lifestyle, clothing, decision making process, resources, where we get the most bang for the buck, and other such musings. Stay tuned.”Check out Marty’s Facebook page and Twitter account. Please welcome back Marty!
Since Huff Post only allows 250 word comments, here is my full response to the article “On Being a Mostly Vegan” by Sasha Turgman
My road to veganism was a slow transition, not a right angled turn.  I want to differentiate someone who eats a plant based diet from someone who is a vegan.  More power to those who
shift their diets.  A vegan is someone who refuses to participate in the oppression of another being, IMHO of course.
Fish and seafood were the last animal products I omitted in my diet.  I would have them 2 or 3 times a month, usually when on the road and unable to find any 100% plant options that INTERESTED me.  I still ate a plant based diet and called myself a “vegan.”  Only now, years later, do I realize the confusion that title caused.  Vegan-esque, vegan-ish all are descriptors of a mostly plant based diet. Vegan is a lifestyle, a philosophy, a belief system which includes a 100% plant based diet but much, much more.
I went vegetarian for my health and replaced animal flesh with Mozzarella En Carozza and Doritos. When I started to not feel so great I did a little research, began to cook, (got really good at cooking), and a funny thing happened.  Whilst doing research into how to eat a healthy plant based diet, (and we all know how many opinions about that there are out there), you absolutely will come across information about how our food is brought to the table.  Pesticides, hormones, antibiotics, and industrialized animal farming will all become household words to you.  You
discover things about your food you really didn’t want to know.  I found this information empowering.
I started to doubt the wisdom of eating fish when my daughter begged me to make swordfish with Giada DiLaurentis’ Mango Salsa.  It was a family favorite but in the discussion I found myself saying things like, “The government recommends that we only have swordfish twice a year,” and, “Because it has mercury and it’s bad for your brain because it’s a heavy metal
poison.”  If this doesn’t stop and make you think about how much you really really want to eat something I don’t know what will.  (Would you eat something if someone said it contained strychnine? You can have a little bit but not too much!).  So I really started to question why we ate things that were toxic!
My last straw, to finally give up the last pesco remnants of my old diet was when I read a report about the levels of toxic chemicals the EPA (or might have been the DEP, I don’t remember), found in fish and 100% of them exceeded the government recommendations for mercury.  That was it.  I became 100% plant based.  Eating seafood just wasn’t that important to me.
After seeing so many videos, reading so many books, I have come to the realization that animals are sentient beings and I don’t believe we have the right to use anyone, human or non, for our own pleasure or entertainment, whether that’s to pleasure our palate or watch an elephant at the circus doing anything but what is natural to her.
There are many small discussions/arguments among vegans that are in a sense petty after one decides to stop eating animals.  Should you throw out all of your leather or wool products?  donate them?  Or just make the decision to not purchase them from here on out? I chose the latter and will still on occasion use my leather work boots.  The funny thing is, I don’t feel good
about it.  I just don’t have an extra $100 dollars sitting around to buy vegan ones.
I went vegan for my health but now I am vegan for the animals.  I feel that we can make the world a better place if we do our parts to minimize pain, suffering, and live a more compassionate life.  If you want to participate in Meatless Mondays, have one animal product free meal each day, or any other iteration of moving towards a 100% plant based diet I applaud you.  If you eat mostly plants and can’t give up your sushi, it’s still better than nothing but I would still say that being 100% plant based is the goal.  Don’t do nothing because you can’t do everything as Coleen
Patrick-Goudreau says.  Go vegan for the animals, for your health, and for the environment.

Guest Blogger: Vegan Farm Girl – People Say the Strangest Things to Vegans

31 May

Every so often I find people tend to say rather strange things to me as a vegan. Today someone insisted that tapioca was an egg and that I shouldn’t eat it as a vegan. I’m pretty sure tapioca isn’t from an egg; what bird pray tell is the tapioca bird? Here is a post from Fianna, author of the blog Vegan Farm Girl about such things that have been said to her. Here she is in her own words, “I am a vegan blogger at Vegan Farm Girl in the City. I’ve been a vegan for 36 years and have lived in every region of the U.S. I am currently working on a second master’s degree in Human Rights and live in New York City. And I make everything from scratch.” Please welcome Fianna!

 

I had thought that being vegan for 36 years was enough time to have heard every moronic vegan comment on the planet. I was sooo wrong. It continues to amaze me what people say about and to vegans.

1. Veganism costs twice as much as eating a “normal” diet. Where are you shopping? Clearly, you aren’t doing it right.

2. Vegans are pale and weak because they don’t eat meat. What? Yes. You’re right. Try not to step on our ghost-like sickly bodies on your way to McDonald’s.

3. Vegans don’t get enough calcium or B12 or protein or vitamin D or whatever in their diets. You’ve been reading Yahoo! News again. That is horse shit. Once you know where to get these nutrients from, it isn’t a problem. And by the way, vitamin D comes from the sun shining on our skins, and has little to do with diet, you idiot.

4. Vegans are destroying the economy. Really? Cool, I didn’t know we had that kind of power. There are so many things on the list of potential destruction. What to work on next…hmmm…

5. Vegans are spreading lies about the meat industry. None of that stuff actually happens. Yeah, okay. Keep telling yourself that.

But my favorite so far was one I read two days ago. I am writing a couple of cookbooks so as one of the most research conscious people on earth, I was looking online at a couple of new agents and publishing houses that publish cookbooks. This is what I read:

Don’t bother sending us a vegan cookbook. The field is overcrowded.

Seriously? What have you been drinking? There are never going to be enough cookbooks on veganism. It isn’t a fad or a celebrity diet that is going to go away after a couple of years. It is so amazing how non-vegans see veganism.

What’s the strangest vegan comment you’ve heard?

Guest Blogger: Until We Eat Again

5 Oct

Please welcome Willie, an American living in Toronto blogging about being vegan while doing his Ph.D. I met Willie in September of this year as we have a mutual vegan friend in common. Very charming fellow! Please enjoy his blog post below.

Hi all!

So today is October 1st, which this year is day one of the Vegan Month of Food, or as it’s more curtly known around the interwebs, VeganMoFo. For those not familiar with this yearly event, VeganMoFo brings together hundreds of vegan bloggers under the shared aim of publishing a continuous stream of content for one entire month—and when I say continuous, I mean a post every day. Why any sane blogger would ever agree to this is beyond me, and why I ever agreed to this is definitely beyond me. Yet here I am, one lunatic among many, signed up and ready to write.

While some bloggers choose to do a specialized theme for VeganMoFo, I’ll be keeping things more or less the same here at UWEA: which is to say, a healthy mix of recipes, restaurant reviews, and general reflections. And today for my first post, I wanted to kick things off with a more reflective post and talk about something that’s been on my mind for a while, and which seems like an appropriate way to inaugurate this month of madness: namely, why I blog.

(And okay, yes, I also wanted an excuse to post these photos of me posing with my friend (and personal photographer)‘s kitten.)


There are many reasons why I started blogging, many of which I’m sure other bloggers share: I wanted to share my food life with others, to keep in touch with friends near and far, to become part of the food blogging community, to meet new people and forge new friendships, to keep a personal record of all the food I make, to help myself remember all the recipes I like, to provide some extra motivation to challenge myself more in the kitchen, and of course, to let my mother know I’m still eating.

These are all excellent reasons for anyone to blog, and even if this were all there was to blogging for me, I’d probably keep doing it. But the more I’ve thought about it, the more I’ve realized that blogging is the ideal medium for the vegan movement. That is, I believe that blogging is the best form of activism that vegans have got going for them right now, and that we have more to gain by blogging than does your average food blogger. Here’s why:

Veganism has made some amazing strides since its inception in the mid-20th century. Today, more people than ever recognize the ethical reasons for being vegan, and many are starting to see the environmental and health benefits, as well. And this is great: veganism is not just a diet but also a lifestyle and ideology, and it’s important for people to see and understand this. However, it’s clear that these arguments only do so much, as there are plenty of people who acknowledge them yet keep on eating animals. And this shouldn’t surprise us, since persuading people by reason alone has never, ever worked.

So what’s missing? As I see it, though people may know why to be vegan, they still don’t know how, or if they can. That is, though people may agree that they should be vegan, and may even want to be vegan, taking that extra step to actually doing it and being vegan can be very difficult. It’s not simply a matter of weakness of will, either; rather, what non-vegans need most is information on how to do it: what vegans eat, how we stay healthy, and where we still struggle—in other words, the normal everyday stuff of how we live our lives. In this way, the biggest challenge facing the vegan movement right now is convincing people that not only is veganism right, but that it’s also joyful and doable, even for perfectly ordinary folks. And this is where blogging steps in.

First and foremost, blogging is egalitarian. Anyone can blog about whatever they want; no agent or publicists or book contracts are required. Because of this, most of the vegan food bloggers you’ll find are ordinary folk—people who are amateurs, if not complete beginners, at writing, cooking, and often, veganism. These are not people trying to make a living off you reading their blog; they’re just folk with a story to tell. Thus if the vegan movement wants to show outsiders that vegans are people with lives like everyone else, the vegan food blogging community provides the perfect place to start.

Second of all, blogging is down-to-earth. On food blogs, nothing need be elevated or haute cuisine; and since bloggers are most often not professional chefs, they actually are the perfect example for other non-professional chefs to follow. What newcomers to veganism need most is food that is tasty and also simple, affordable, and unintimidating—and to me, food blogs are the best place to find such recipes, since bloggers themselves are often still relative novices in the kitchen and always on the lookout for new culinary shortcuts and secrets. The ingenuity and small tricks you’ll see and learn on blogs are the sort of thing you’ll rarely read in books or hear from chefs, but they can really take your cooking to new levels. (The abundance of blog photos guiding you along every step of the way also helps on this score.) Which is all to say: if you want to learn how to become vegan, food blogs are an excellent way in.

Finally and most importantly, blogging is diverse. Possibly the greatest asset blogging has over any other medium is its sheer diversity. Since anyone can do it, lots of people do, and the variety of vegan food bloggers you’ll find out there is astounding. And this means that every fledgling vegan has all the more chance of finding a blogger that speaks directly to them and their unique situation. Whether you’re an aspiring vegan mother, father, student, or ultra-marathon runner, there’s a blog for every lifestyle. And this is what non-vegans most need to see: that vegans are just like them, with busy lives and multiple responsibilities—and nonetheless able to eat the foods they know they should.

And that’s why I keep blogging: because I honestly feel like it’s part of something bigger, to whatever small extent; because I want others to hear my story and see how a grad student copes with the pressures of being vegan; and because I think it’s precisely the sort of activism that’s most needed right now if veganism is to gain any real presence in the population.

And I guess that’s part of the reason I signed up for VeganMoFo, too, making this a fitting way to start off the month. So get ready: you’re about to see a lot more blogging here than ever before. Just don’t expect to see another post this long until this month is over.

VeganMoFo #1/31

Until we eat again,

Willie

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 5,422 other followers